Events

Events


Events are invaluable to moving global health forward. They are opportunities to exchange insight, test out new ideas, and make connections.

All Dahdaleh Institute events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.


Calendar

Jan
31
Thu
2019
Right to Health: An overlooked driver of access to essential medicines
Jan 31 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am
Right to Health: An overlooked driver of access to essential medicines @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

Dr. Katrina Perehudoff delivers her presentation to the Global Health Search Committee. This presentation is open to the public and everyone is invited to ask questions.

Feb
21
Thu
2019
Darwin's Nightmare | Film Viewing
Feb 21 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Darwin's Nightmare | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

107min | Dir. Hubert Sauper | 2004

What do an invasive fish species and the arms trade have to do with each other? The answer creeps up on you in this documentary about Lake Victoria in the Great Lakes Region.

Click here to learn more

The DIGHR is getting an education on the art of moving images. Join us as we watch documentaries, thrillers and experimental films on global health themes. Feel free to bring your lunch and your inner film critic.

May
2
Thu
2019
Watership Down | Film Viewing
May 2 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Watership Down | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

92min | Dir. Martin Rosen | 1978

This children’s film may be as much religious allegory as environmental didacticism, but we have it on good authority that it will make you cry.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

May
9
Thu
2019
Mad Max Fury Road | Film Viewing
May 9 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Mad Max Fury Road | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

120min | Dir. George Miller | 2015

A post-apocalyptic environmentalist-Marxist-feminist take on the classic road trip movie. Was it worth damaging the Namib desert to make this film?

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films.To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

Aug
8
Thu
2019
Information Design for the Common Good | Lunch & Learn
Aug 8 @ 12:15 pm – 1:45 pm
Information Design for the Common Good | Lunch & Learn @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute Offices

Designers are increasingly involved in the world of social good. Traditionally installed in commercial sectors, they are now collaborating with scientists, researchers and others non-designers with their own knowledge-base and processes. These interdisciplinary encounters are often new, exciting and challenging.

Drawing on her experiences of this phenomenon, and on the research behind her upcoming book Information Design for the Common Good, Courtney Marchese will lead a Lunch & Learn on interdisciplinary design collaboration in global health.

Courtney Marchese is a professional designer with over a decade of experience specializing in data visualizations, information graphics, UX design, and usability studies. She is also an Associate Professor of Graphic + Interactive Design, teaching a wide range of design theory, research, and technical skills at the undergraduate and graduate level.

Nov
13
Wed
2019
Protecting Digital Public Health: Towards a Regulatory Framework for Internet Pharmacies | Seminar
Nov 13 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Protecting Digital Public Health: Towards a Regulatory Framework for Internet Pharmacies | Seminar @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

To address the rising cost of medicines, patients and policymakers are increasingly turning to personal importation through Internet Pharmacies. Despite their potential to improve access to affordable medicines, most countries do not sufficiently regulate Internet Pharmacies, exacerbating public health risks.

The aim of this presentation will be twofold. Using stakeholder and supply chain mapping, the first task will be to determine if and how safety and quality of medicines sold over the Internet can be protected. The broader objective will be to apply a public health framework to evaluate emerging strategies of regulating Internet Pharmacies. In addition to mainstream proposals of expanding the jurisdictional scope of existing regulatory authorities, we consider disruptive internet governance strategies that delegate public health functions to technology intermediaries.

Aria Ilyad Ahmad is the Global Health Foresighting Research Fellow at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research. Since 2014, he has also served as a consultant to the World Health Organization's Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products. Aria is a past Duke University Global Health Fellow and past faculty member of the Global Health Education Initiative at the University of Toronto. He has testified before the Canadian Senate on Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime, served on the board of directors of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, and was the inaugural Médecins Sans Frontières Access to Medicines Fellow in India. Aria received his HBSc and MSc in international pharmaceutical policy from the University of Toronto, and is completing his PhD in global health governance at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada.

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Jan
22
Wed
2020
Embodied Ecological Heritage: Health, Happiness and Identity | Guest Lecture
Jan 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Embodied Ecological Heritage: Health, Happiness and Identity | Guest Lecture @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

A holistic definition of ‘health’ remains difficult to operationalize, despite decades of attempts by medical anthropologists and the World Health Organization to do so. Anthropologists routinely reject dichotomous notions – belief vs. knowledge, wellness vs. health, mental vs. physical, environment vs. self – yet our desire for physiological evidence of ‘health’ still persists.

In this talk, Dr. Baines asks what evidence would sufficiently demonstrate health, and explore the possibility of measures that move beyond the physiological. Presenting ethnographic data collected in indigenous Maya communities in Belize and in indigenous Belizean Garifuna communities in New York City and Los Angeles, she argues that ecological heritage practices can provide a lens through which to locate and collect evidence of health, holistically defined.

Developing a framework of ‘embodied ecological heritage’ (EEH), she discusses how communities and individuals communicate and measure health as part of everyday ecological activities, which they describe as ‘traditional’ or ‘heritage’ practices. Theorizing unexpected links and feedback loops, which cross temporal, spatial, and social boundaries, she asserts that health is connected to practice through tangible, embodied experience and that ethnography thus provides powerful evidence to understand and define it.

Kristina Baines is an Assistant Professor at CUNY, Guttman CC, Director of Anthropology of Cool Anthropology, and author of Embodying Ecological Heritage in a Maya Community: Health, Happiness, and Identity. She can usually be found considering how being on a particular patch of Earth affects our wellness, and she attempts to translate all those convoluted data so that humans can understand, use and, perhaps, even enjoy them.

Kristina has been formally trained in applied, sociocultural, ecological and medical anthropology at Florida Atlantic University (BA, MA), the University of Oxford (MSc) and the University of South Florida (PhD). Her interests include environment + health intersections, ecological heritage, phenomenology and educational anthropology. She has conducted research in Belize, Guatemala, Peru and South Florida.

Co-presented with the Department of Anthropology


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Mar
13
Fri
2020
Book Launch | The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change
Mar 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Book Launch | The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change @ Arts & Letters Club

Join the Dahdaleh Institute and Postdoc Mark Terry to celebrate the release of his new book, The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change.

Based on his PhD thesis, the book introduces the Geo-Doc as a new form of documentary film designed to maximize the influential power of the documentary film as an agent of social change.


Author

Mark Terry is the Postdoctoral Fellow, Documentary Film & Global Health at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research, cross-appointed at the Faculties of Health and Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. He has worked throughout the global Arctic serving as the Scientist-in-Residence on Adventure Canada’s circumnavigation of Iceland (2018), making the first documented film of a crossing of the Northwest Passage, The Polar Explorer (2011), and teaching at Arctic universities in St. Petersburg and Moscow, Russia. He has also worked in Antarctica with the British Antarctic Survey and the National Antarctic Scientific Center of Ukraine documenting this research in the film The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning (2009).

As a member of The Explorers Club, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the Canadian Council for Geographic Education, the Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Mark teaches and speaks regularly about the environmental issues affecting the fragile eco-systems of the polar regions and, by extension, the world.


Synopsis

This book introduces a new form of documentary film: the Geo-Doc, designed to maximize the influential power of the documentary film as an agent of social change. By combining the proven methods and approaches as evidenced through historical, theoretical, digital, and ecocritical investigations with the unique affordances of Geographic Information System technology, a dynamic new documentary form emerges, one tested in the field with the United Nations. This book begins with an overview of the history of the documentary film with attention given to how it evolved as an instrument of social change. It examines theories surrounding mobilizing the documentary film as a communication tool between filmmakers and policymakers. Ecocinema and its semiotic storytelling techniques are also explored for their unique approaches in audience engagement. The proven methods identified throughout the book are combined with the spatial and temporal affordances provided by GIS technology to create the Geo-Doc, a new tool for the activist documentarian.


Poster

Click here to download the event poster.