Events

Events


Getting people in a room together to discuss, learn and network is invaluable to moving global health forward.

Join us at our seminal Global Health Research Seminar Series, where leading researchers in global health present their latest work and hold an open discussion. By exploring the best in current research, the series builds perspective on the direction of global health research more broadly.

We also host Journal Club, Lunch & Learns, guest lectures, panels, showcases, discussions, presentations, publication launches, film screenings and more.

All events are free, open to the public, and are BYOF (Bring-Your-Own-Food), unless otherwise noted.


Calendar

Feb
21
Thu
2019
Darwin's Nightmare | Film Viewing
Feb 21 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Darwin's Nightmare | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

107min | Dir. Hubert Sauper | 2004

What do an invasive fish species and the arms trade have to do with each other? The answer creeps up on you in this documentary about Lake Victoria in the Great Lakes Region.

Click here to learn more

The DIGHR is getting an education on the art of moving images. Join us as we watch documentaries, thrillers and experimental films on global health themes. Feel free to bring your lunch and your inner film critic.

Mar
15
Fri
2019
Beyond Borders | Film Viewing
Mar 15 @ 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Beyond Borders | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

127min | Dir. Martin Campbell | 2003

Watch Angelina Jolie save the children, save her man and harness her Girl Power™ in a film that might have asked interesting ethical questions but does a whole lot of other things instead.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

Apr
24
Wed
2019
Research Trip Report Back: Health of Displaced People in Central America | Lunch & Learn
Apr 24 @ 12:15 pm – 1:00 pm
Research Trip Report Back: Health of Displaced People in Central America | Lunch & Learn @ Dahdaleh Institute Boardroom

Community Scholar Linn Biorklund Belliveau recently returned from Mexico, where she conducted research on the health of Honduran migrants in Mexico, towards her major project Health of Displaced People in the Context of Climate Change & Restrictive Migration Policies.

Migrants from Northern Central America seeking refuge in Mexico are affected by the intersection of environmental degradation; trends in state policy which increasingly diverge from international norms; and the criminalisation of transnational humanitarian spaces.

In this Lunch and Learn, Linn will present an initial analysis of how these determinants endanger personal safety, health and dignity. She will share impressions from a recent visit to the southern Mexican state Tabasco. Three areas will be explored:
*Effects of prolonged droughts and a coffee-plant epidemic in western Honduras
*Mexican immigration politics - including decreased border controls and increased use of humanitarian visas - since President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office 
*Insecurities along the Guatemala-Mexico border, and the Mexico-US border hampering access to humanitarian assistance and protection

Click here to register. Registration preferred.


Image Credit: (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images) Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the U.S., hold a demonstration demanding authorities to allow the rest of the group to cross, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas, Mexico after crossing from Guatemala, on Oct. 20, 2018.


May
2
Thu
2019
Watership Down | Film Viewing
May 2 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Watership Down | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

92min | Dir. Martin Rosen | 1978

This children’s film may be as much religious allegory as environmental didacticism, but we have it on good authority that it will make you cry.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

May
9
Thu
2019
Mad Max Fury Road | Film Viewing
May 9 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Mad Max Fury Road | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

120min | Dir. George Miller | 2015

A post-apocalyptic environmentalist-Marxist-feminist take on the classic road trip movie. Was it worth damaging the Namib desert to make this film?

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films.To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

Aug
8
Thu
2019
Information Design for the Common Good | Lunch & Learn
Aug 8 @ 12:15 pm – 1:45 pm
Information Design for the Common Good | Lunch & Learn @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute Offices

Designers are increasingly involved in the world of social good. Traditionally installed in commercial sectors, they are now collaborating with scientists, researchers and others non-designers with their own knowledge-base and processes. These interdisciplinary encounters are often new, exciting and challenging.

Drawing on her experiences of this phenomenon, and on the research behind her upcoming book Information Design for the Common Good, Courtney Marchese will lead a Lunch & Learn on interdisciplinary design collaboration in global health.

Courtney Marchese is a professional designer with over a decade of experience specializing in data visualizations, information graphics, UX design, and usability studies. She is also an Associate Professor of Graphic + Interactive Design, teaching a wide range of design theory, research, and technical skills at the undergraduate and graduate level.

Jan
22
Wed
2020
Embodied Ecological Heritage: Health, Happiness and Identity | Guest Lecture
Jan 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Embodied Ecological Heritage: Health, Happiness and Identity | Guest Lecture @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

A holistic definition of ‘health’ remains difficult to operationalize, despite decades of attempts by medical anthropologists and the World Health Organization to do so. Anthropologists routinely reject dichotomous notions – belief vs. knowledge, wellness vs. health, mental vs. physical, environment vs. self – yet our desire for physiological evidence of ‘health’ still persists.

In this talk, Dr. Baines asks what evidence would sufficiently demonstrate health, and explore the possibility of measures that move beyond the physiological. Presenting ethnographic data collected in indigenous Maya communities in Belize and in indigenous Belizean Garifuna communities in New York City and Los Angeles, she argues that ecological heritage practices can provide a lens through which to locate and collect evidence of health, holistically defined.

Developing a framework of ‘embodied ecological heritage’ (EEH), she discusses how communities and individuals communicate and measure health as part of everyday ecological activities, which they describe as ‘traditional’ or ‘heritage’ practices. Theorizing unexpected links and feedback loops, which cross temporal, spatial, and social boundaries, she asserts that health is connected to practice through tangible, embodied experience and that ethnography thus provides powerful evidence to understand and define it.

Kristina Baines is an Assistant Professor at CUNY, Guttman CC, Director of Anthropology of Cool Anthropology, and author of Embodying Ecological Heritage in a Maya Community: Health, Happiness, and Identity. She can usually be found considering how being on a particular patch of Earth affects our wellness, and she attempts to translate all those convoluted data so that humans can understand, use and, perhaps, even enjoy them.

Kristina has been formally trained in applied, sociocultural, ecological and medical anthropology at Florida Atlantic University (BA, MA), the University of Oxford (MSc) and the University of South Florida (PhD). Her interests include environment + health intersections, ecological heritage, phenomenology and educational anthropology. She has conducted research in Belize, Guatemala, Peru and South Florida.

Co-presented with the Department of Anthropology


Register


Mar
13
Fri
2020
Book Launch | The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change
Mar 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Book Launch | The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change @ Arts & Letters Club

Join the Dahdaleh Institute and Postdoc Mark Terry to celebrate the release of his new book, The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change.

Based on his PhD thesis, the book introduces the Geo-Doc as a new form of documentary film designed to maximize the influential power of the documentary film as an agent of social change.


Author

Mark Terry is the Postdoctoral Fellow, Documentary Film & Global Health at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research, cross-appointed at the Faculties of Health and Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. He has worked throughout the global Arctic serving as the Scientist-in-Residence on Adventure Canada’s circumnavigation of Iceland (2018), making the first documented film of a crossing of the Northwest Passage, The Polar Explorer (2011), and teaching at Arctic universities in St. Petersburg and Moscow, Russia. He has also worked in Antarctica with the British Antarctic Survey and the National Antarctic Scientific Center of Ukraine documenting this research in the film The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning (2009).

As a member of The Explorers Club, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the Canadian Council for Geographic Education, the Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Mark teaches and speaks regularly about the environmental issues affecting the fragile eco-systems of the polar regions and, by extension, the world.


Synopsis

This book introduces a new form of documentary film: the Geo-Doc, designed to maximize the influential power of the documentary film as an agent of social change. By combining the proven methods and approaches as evidenced through historical, theoretical, digital, and ecocritical investigations with the unique affordances of Geographic Information System technology, a dynamic new documentary form emerges, one tested in the field with the United Nations. This book begins with an overview of the history of the documentary film with attention given to how it evolved as an instrument of social change. It examines theories surrounding mobilizing the documentary film as a communication tool between filmmakers and policymakers. Ecocinema and its semiotic storytelling techniques are also explored for their unique approaches in audience engagement. The proven methods identified throughout the book are combined with the spatial and temporal affordances provided by GIS technology to create the Geo-Doc, a new tool for the activist documentarian.


Poster

Click here to download the event poster.