Events

Events


Events are invaluable to moving global health forward. They are opportunities to exchange insight, test out new ideas, and make connections.

All Dahdaleh Institute events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.


Calendar

Jan
31
Thu
2019
Right to Health: An overlooked driver of access to essential medicines
Jan 31 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am
Right to Health: An overlooked driver of access to essential medicines @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

Dr. Katrina Perehudoff delivers her presentation to the Global Health Search Committee. This presentation is open to the public and everyone is invited to ask questions.

Mar
6
Wed
2019
Reza Majdzadeh (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation
Mar 6 @ 9:15 am – 10:15 am
Reza Majdzadeh (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation @ DIGHR Boardroom, Suite 2150, Dahdaleh Building

Be part of the hiring process for the next generation of Global Health Members of Faculty.

Dr. Reza Majdzadeh has been shortlisted for a position in Global Health at the Faculty of Health. As part of the hiring process, Dr. Majdzadeh will showcase his insight and teaching style in a presentation to the Global Health Search Committee and members of the YorkU community. Students at all levels are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Reza Majdzadeh is a Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the School of Public Health at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, where he is based at the Knowledge Utilization Research Center & Center for Community Based Participatory Research Dr. Majdzadeh main interests are evidence-informed decision-making, using knowledge to improve health, and reducing the gap in health. He was selected as Iran’s distinguished researcher in health at the country level in 2010 and as the best teacher at TUMS in 2008.

Dr. Majdzadeh will join us remotely from Tehran.

This event is part of the Teaching & Research Presentation series. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Oghenowede Eyawo (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation
Mar 6 @ 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm
Oghenowede Eyawo (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation @ DIGHR Boardroom, Suite 2150, Dahdaleh Building

Be part of the hiring process for the next generation of Global Health Members of Faculty.

Dr. Oghenowede Eyawo has been shortlisted for a position in Global Health at the Faculty of Health. As part of the hiring process, he will showcase his insight and teaching style in a presentation to the Global Health Search Committee and members of the YorkU community. Students at all levels are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Oghenowede Eyawo, PhD, MPH, MSc is a CANOC Post-doctoral Fellow and Researcher at the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE). His primary research interest is in HIV and aging, response to antiviral therapy among HIV and hepatitis C virus-infected individuals, outcomes and health services research. He also has a keen interest in methodological aspects of study designs in observational and experimental epidemiology. At the BC-CfE, he leads a large, population-based study aimed at investigating the health outcomes and health care services utilization of HIV-positive men and women.

Dr. Eyawo is a recipient of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Doctoral Scholarship Award, a Universities Without Walls Fellow — a CIHR Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research, and a Co-Investigator on a number of CIHR and US National Institutes of Health funded projects.

This event is part of the Teaching & Research Presentation series. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Mar
21
Thu
2019
Kristy Hackett (Program Evaluation) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation
Mar 21 @ 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm
Kristy Hackett (Program Evaluation) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation @ DIGHR Boardroom, Suite 2150, Dahdaleh Building

Be part of the hiring process for the next generation of Global Health Members of Faculty.

Dr. Kristy Hackett has been shortlisted for a position in Global Health at the Faculty of Health. As part of the hiring process, she will showcase her insight and teaching style in a presentation to the Global Health Search Committee and members of the YorkU community. Students at all levels are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Kristy Hackett is a Research Associate at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her work is grounded in principles of global health equity, and draws on perspectives in medical anthropology and public health sciences. She aims to enhance the capacity of health systems and programs to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) outcomes in hard-to-reach populations. Dr. Hackett has led and contributed to RMNCH research projects based in North America, Sub-Saharan Africa and South/Southeast Asia.

This event is part of the Teaching & Research Presentation series. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Aug
8
Thu
2019
Information Design for the Common Good | Lunch & Learn
Aug 8 @ 12:15 pm – 1:45 pm
Information Design for the Common Good | Lunch & Learn @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute Offices

Designers are increasingly involved in the world of social good. Traditionally installed in commercial sectors, they are now collaborating with scientists, researchers and others non-designers with their own knowledge-base and processes. These interdisciplinary encounters are often new, exciting and challenging.

Drawing on her experiences of this phenomenon, and on the research behind her upcoming book Information Design for the Common Good, Courtney Marchese will lead a Lunch & Learn on interdisciplinary design collaboration in global health.

Courtney Marchese is a professional designer with over a decade of experience specializing in data visualizations, information graphics, UX design, and usability studies. She is also an Associate Professor of Graphic + Interactive Design, teaching a wide range of design theory, research, and technical skills at the undergraduate and graduate level.

Nov
13
Wed
2019
Protecting Digital Public Health: Towards a Regulatory Framework for Internet Pharmacies | Seminar
Nov 13 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Protecting Digital Public Health: Towards a Regulatory Framework for Internet Pharmacies | Seminar @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

To address the rising cost of medicines, patients and policymakers are increasingly turning to personal importation through Internet Pharmacies. Despite their potential to improve access to affordable medicines, most countries do not sufficiently regulate Internet Pharmacies, exacerbating public health risks.

The aim of this presentation will be twofold. Using stakeholder and supply chain mapping, the first task will be to determine if and how safety and quality of medicines sold over the Internet can be protected. The broader objective will be to apply a public health framework to evaluate emerging strategies of regulating Internet Pharmacies. In addition to mainstream proposals of expanding the jurisdictional scope of existing regulatory authorities, we consider disruptive internet governance strategies that delegate public health functions to technology intermediaries.

Aria Ilyad Ahmad is the Global Health Foresighting Research Fellow at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research. Since 2014, he has also served as a consultant to the World Health Organization's Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products. Aria is a past Duke University Global Health Fellow and past faculty member of the Global Health Education Initiative at the University of Toronto. He has testified before the Canadian Senate on Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime, served on the board of directors of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, and was the inaugural Médecins Sans Frontières Access to Medicines Fellow in India. Aria received his HBSc and MSc in international pharmaceutical policy from the University of Toronto, and is completing his PhD in global health governance at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada.

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Feb
5
Wed
2020
Assessing Quality of Tuberculosis Care in South Africa Using Standardized Patients
Feb 5 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
Assessing Quality of Tuberculosis Care in South Africa Using Standardized Patients @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

South Africa has the third highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) and the highest burden of TB-HIV co-infection globally. Efforts to curb TB have focussed on strengthening the public sector. Yet, a third of South Africans with active TB symptoms first seek care in the private sector where the quality of care remains poorly understood. In this talk, Angela Salomon will present an ongoing study (2017-2020) utilising the standardised patient (SP) methodology to determine how TB and TB-HIV are managed among private general practitioners (GPs) in an urban area of KwaZulu-Natal province. Eight healthy SPs underwent extensive training in typical TB case presentations and completed 220 unannounced visits with 96 consenting GPs. The results of these clinical interactions as a means to assess quality of care for TB and TB-HIV are presented in this talk.


Speaker

Angie Salomon, MPH, is a medical student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. She works with Assistant Professor Dr. Amrita Daftary (Global Health, York University) and is a research assistant with the McGill International Tuberculosis Centre. There, Angie conducts data management and analysis on a study of the quality of tuberculosis care in South Africa using standardized patients. She also performs a systematic review on interventions to improve linkage gaps along TB-HIV care cascades in low and middle-income countries.

Angie completed her MPH in Epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, where she explored quantitative and mixed-methods research in infectious diseases and maternal health, both at home and abroad. During this time, she worked with the Population Council in Abuja, Nigeria, assessing quality of antenatal care as it pertains to pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. She had previously worked with Grand Challenges Canada as a program assistant for Every Woman Every Child Innovation Marketplace.

Passionate about health equity, Angie works to measure and improve the quality of healthcare delivery locally and globally.


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Mar
11
Wed
2020
Health, Hunger, and Malaria in South Asian History
Mar 11 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Health, Hunger, and Malaria in South Asian History @ Room 626, Kaneff Tower, YorkU Keele Campus

A central role for hunger in the historical mortality burden of malaria in colonial South Asia was commonplace in the sanitary records of nineteenth-century British India. Malaria mortality declined markedly with the control of famine after 1920 – a decline that predated by more than three decades the control of malaria transmission in the region with the mid-1950s DDT-based malaria eradication program.

This experience thus highlights the significance of shifts in the lethality of common endemic infections in relation to food security as a central feature of the region’s rising life expectancy from pre-modern levels – an understanding and epistemic framework that generally has been lost in modern epidemiologic, nutritional, and historiographic thought.

The question of how this understanding was lost has epistemological implications beyond South Asia. They include the importance of reclaiming conceptual distinctions between acute and chronic hunger and an epidemiological approach to hunger and subsistence precarity in health history.


Speaker

Sheila Zurbrigg obtained her MD degree from the University of Western Ontario and a Master of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley. Her interest in rural child health led her to India (1974-79), where she helped develop a primary health program in rural Tamil Nadu, working with the traditional village midwives of Ramnad district; this experience led to an analysis of child survival in contemporary India in relation to food security and conditions of women’s work. Her discovery of S.R. Christophers’s 1911 study, Malaria in the Punjab, linking malaria mortality to the price of staple foodgrains, led her to explore more deeply the historical role of hunger in malaria lethality in South Asia, funded as a private scholar by SSHRC. Between 1993 and 2013 she taught part-time at Dalhousie University in the departments of History and International Development Studies. Her most recent historical monograph investigates the epistemic shifts in modern medical and nutritional thought leading to loss of understanding of the role of acute hunger in the region’s malaria mortality history.


Co-presented by the York Centre for Asian Research and the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research.