Events

Events


Events are invaluable to moving global health forward. They are opportunities to exchange insight, test out new ideas, and make connections.

All Dahdaleh Institute events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.


Calendar

Feb
6
Wed
2019
Blockchain for Climate with Joseph Pallant | Presentation & Discussion
Feb 6 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Blockchain for Climate with Joseph Pallant | Presentation & Discussion @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

The Founder and Executive Director of the Blockchain for Climate Foundation joins us to share how his organization is connecting the world’s National Carbon Accounts, putting the Paris Agreement on the blockchain.

Recognizing that technological innovation cannot be isolated from other strategies, Pallant will lead a discussion on how to engage the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the broader international climate community to deliver on concrete actions which can create improved global health futures.

Joseph Pallant is the Founder and Executive Director of the Blockchain for Climate Foundation and the Director of Climate Innovation, Ecotrust Canada

Click here to register.

Mar
6
Wed
2019
Reza Majdzadeh (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation
Mar 6 @ 9:15 am – 10:15 am
Reza Majdzadeh (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation @ DIGHR Boardroom, Suite 2150, Dahdaleh Building

Be part of the hiring process for the next generation of Global Health Members of Faculty.

Dr. Reza Majdzadeh has been shortlisted for a position in Global Health at the Faculty of Health. As part of the hiring process, Dr. Majdzadeh will showcase his insight and teaching style in a presentation to the Global Health Search Committee and members of the YorkU community. Students at all levels are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Reza Majdzadeh is a Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the School of Public Health at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, where he is based at the Knowledge Utilization Research Center & Center for Community Based Participatory Research Dr. Majdzadeh main interests are evidence-informed decision-making, using knowledge to improve health, and reducing the gap in health. He was selected as Iran’s distinguished researcher in health at the country level in 2010 and as the best teacher at TUMS in 2008.

Dr. Majdzadeh will join us remotely from Tehran.

This event is part of the Teaching & Research Presentation series. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Oghenowede Eyawo (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation
Mar 6 @ 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm
Oghenowede Eyawo (Epidemiology) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation @ DIGHR Boardroom, Suite 2150, Dahdaleh Building

Be part of the hiring process for the next generation of Global Health Members of Faculty.

Dr. Oghenowede Eyawo has been shortlisted for a position in Global Health at the Faculty of Health. As part of the hiring process, he will showcase his insight and teaching style in a presentation to the Global Health Search Committee and members of the YorkU community. Students at all levels are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Oghenowede Eyawo, PhD, MPH, MSc is a CANOC Post-doctoral Fellow and Researcher at the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE). His primary research interest is in HIV and aging, response to antiviral therapy among HIV and hepatitis C virus-infected individuals, outcomes and health services research. He also has a keen interest in methodological aspects of study designs in observational and experimental epidemiology. At the BC-CfE, he leads a large, population-based study aimed at investigating the health outcomes and health care services utilization of HIV-positive men and women.

Dr. Eyawo is a recipient of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Doctoral Scholarship Award, a Universities Without Walls Fellow — a CIHR Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research, and a Co-Investigator on a number of CIHR and US National Institutes of Health funded projects.

This event is part of the Teaching & Research Presentation series. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Mar
15
Fri
2019
Beyond Borders | Film Viewing
Mar 15 @ 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Beyond Borders | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

127min | Dir. Martin Campbell | 2003

Watch Angelina Jolie save the children, save her man and harness her Girl Power™ in a film that might have asked interesting ethical questions but does a whole lot of other things instead.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

Mar
21
Thu
2019
Kristy Hackett (Program Evaluation) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation
Mar 21 @ 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm
Kristy Hackett (Program Evaluation) Presents to the Global Health Search Committee | Presentation @ DIGHR Boardroom, Suite 2150, Dahdaleh Building

Be part of the hiring process for the next generation of Global Health Members of Faculty.

Dr. Kristy Hackett has been shortlisted for a position in Global Health at the Faculty of Health. As part of the hiring process, she will showcase her insight and teaching style in a presentation to the Global Health Search Committee and members of the YorkU community. Students at all levels are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Kristy Hackett is a Research Associate at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her work is grounded in principles of global health equity, and draws on perspectives in medical anthropology and public health sciences. She aims to enhance the capacity of health systems and programs to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) outcomes in hard-to-reach populations. Dr. Hackett has led and contributed to RMNCH research projects based in North America, Sub-Saharan Africa and South/Southeast Asia.

This event is part of the Teaching & Research Presentation series. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Mar
11
Wed
2020
Health, Hunger, and Malaria in South Asian History
Mar 11 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Health, Hunger, and Malaria in South Asian History @ Room 626, Kaneff Tower, YorkU Keele Campus

A central role for hunger in the historical mortality burden of malaria in colonial South Asia was commonplace in the sanitary records of nineteenth-century British India. Malaria mortality declined markedly with the control of famine after 1920 – a decline that predated by more than three decades the control of malaria transmission in the region with the mid-1950s DDT-based malaria eradication program.

This experience thus highlights the significance of shifts in the lethality of common endemic infections in relation to food security as a central feature of the region’s rising life expectancy from pre-modern levels – an understanding and epistemic framework that generally has been lost in modern epidemiologic, nutritional, and historiographic thought.

The question of how this understanding was lost has epistemological implications beyond South Asia. They include the importance of reclaiming conceptual distinctions between acute and chronic hunger and an epidemiological approach to hunger and subsistence precarity in health history.


Speaker

Sheila Zurbrigg obtained her MD degree from the University of Western Ontario and a Master of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley. Her interest in rural child health led her to India (1974-79), where she helped develop a primary health program in rural Tamil Nadu, working with the traditional village midwives of Ramnad district; this experience led to an analysis of child survival in contemporary India in relation to food security and conditions of women’s work. Her discovery of S.R. Christophers’s 1911 study, Malaria in the Punjab, linking malaria mortality to the price of staple foodgrains, led her to explore more deeply the historical role of hunger in malaria lethality in South Asia, funded as a private scholar by SSHRC. Between 1993 and 2013 she taught part-time at Dalhousie University in the departments of History and International Development Studies. Her most recent historical monograph investigates the epistemic shifts in modern medical and nutritional thought leading to loss of understanding of the role of acute hunger in the region’s malaria mortality history.


Co-presented by the York Centre for Asian Research and the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research.