Events

Events


Events are invaluable to moving global health forward. They are opportunities to exchange insight, test out new ideas, and make connections.

All Dahdaleh Institute events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.


Calendar

Jan
31
Thu
2019
Right to Health: An overlooked driver of access to essential medicines
Jan 31 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am
Right to Health: An overlooked driver of access to essential medicines @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

Dr. Katrina Perehudoff delivers her presentation to the Global Health Search Committee. This presentation is open to the public and everyone is invited to ask questions.

Feb
21
Thu
2019
Darwin's Nightmare | Film Viewing
Feb 21 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Darwin's Nightmare | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

107min | Dir. Hubert Sauper | 2004

What do an invasive fish species and the arms trade have to do with each other? The answer creeps up on you in this documentary about Lake Victoria in the Great Lakes Region.

Click here to learn more

The DIGHR is getting an education on the art of moving images. Join us as we watch documentaries, thrillers and experimental films on global health themes. Feel free to bring your lunch and your inner film critic.

Mar
7
Thu
2019
Episode III. Enjoy Poverty | Film Viewing
Mar 7 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Episode III. Enjoy Poverty | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

90min | Dir. Renzo Martens | 2009

Artist Renzo Martens tells the Congolese their poverty is their greatest asset in this satirical documentary.

Click here to learn more

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Mar
19
Tue
2019
Miners Shot Down | Film Viewing
Mar 19 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Miners Shot Down | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

86min | Dir. Rehad Desai | 2014

Award-winning, thoroughly- researched documentary about the Marikana massacre in South Africa, during which security forces killed striking miners. We’ll watch it the week of the Sharpeville massacre anniversary, to which the Marikana massacre has been compared.

Click here to learn more

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Apr
4
Thu
2019
Anote's Ark | Film Viewing
Apr 4 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Anote's Ark | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

77min | Dir. Matthieu Rytz | 2018

The urgency of climate change, at its current pace, is made clear in this documentary as the island nation of Kiribati disappears beneath rising sea levels.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

Apr
12
Fri
2019
The Shape of Water: Women in the Developing World Offer Solutions | Film Viewing
Apr 12 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
The Shape of Water: Women in the Developing World Offer Solutions | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

70min | Dir. Kum-Kum Bhavnani | 2006

This documentary tells the stories of women in Brazil, Senegal, Israel/Palestine and India working towards justice.

Click here to learn more.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Apr
18
Thu
2019
The Bleeding Edge | Film Viewing
Apr 18 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
The Bleeding Edge | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

99min | Dir. Kirby Dick | 2018

If you can’t get enough of Big Pharma, this Netflix documentary will take you into the similarly terrifying world of the medical device industry.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

Apr
25
Thu
2019
Moolaade | Film Viewing
Apr 25 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Moolaade | Film Viewing @ Boardroom, DIGHR Offices

124min | Dir. Ousmane Sembene | 2004

A nuanced look at female circumcision/female genital mutilation set in Burkina Faso from master filmmaker Ousmane Sembene. Conflict arises when a woman shelters a group of girls who do not want to undergo female circumcision/FGM.

This event is part of Projections: the good, the bad and the weird of global health films. To receive a reminder of this event, click here.

Watch the trailer

May
15
Wed
2019
Documentary Film as an Instrument of Social Change
May 15 @ 12:15 pm – 1:00 pm
Documentary Film as an Instrument of Social Change @ Dahdaleh Institute Boardroom

Mark Terry, Post-Doctoral Fellow in Documentary Film & Global Health, will lead a seminar to introduce his research projects and speak to the role of documentary film in creating social change.

Mark has been producing film and television for the past 25 years. Working closely with the world’s scientific community in Antarctica and the Arctic earned him the recognition of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. His two films – The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning and The Polar Explorer – were made in partnership with UNEP and both premiered at the Climate Change Conferences in Copenhagen and Cancun. Together, both films have won 19 international film awards for excellence.

Read more about his projects, Documentary Film World, The Changing Face of Iceland, Youth Climate Report, and Ecological Footprint Health Indicators, which he works on with Planetary Health Research Fellow Byomkesh Talukder.

Oct
16
Wed
2019
Mark Terry Delivers Keynote at Literary and Cultural Discourses on Mobility
Oct 16 – Oct 18 all-day
Mark Terry Delivers Keynote at Literary and Cultural Discourses on Mobility @ University of Göttingen, Germany

The workshop "Literary and Cultural Discourses on Mobility" explores mobilities in any cultural, historical, and (trans-)medial scene and configuration, and follows the dynamics of ideas, texts, images, affects, styles, things and objects, and people on the move over real and imaginary spaces and boundaries. It is especially concerned with representations and discourses of mobility across different periods, cultures, genres, and media and the techniques that render the aesthetic object mobile in all kinds of translations, adaptations, and networks of transfer and transformation. Finally, mobility has itself proven to be a ‘travelling concept’ (Bal 2002) that mobilises inter- and transdisciplinary research and suggests new routes across disciplinary terrains.

Dahdaleh Institute Postdoc Mark Terry will deliver the Keynote Address, entitled Audience Mobilization: New Approaches to Documentary Film Engagement.

Nov
13
Wed
2019
Protecting Digital Public Health: Towards a Regulatory Framework for Internet Pharmacies | Seminar
Nov 13 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Protecting Digital Public Health: Towards a Regulatory Framework for Internet Pharmacies | Seminar @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

To address the rising cost of medicines, patients and policymakers are increasingly turning to personal importation through Internet Pharmacies. Despite their potential to improve access to affordable medicines, most countries do not sufficiently regulate Internet Pharmacies, exacerbating public health risks.

The aim of this presentation will be twofold. Using stakeholder and supply chain mapping, the first task will be to determine if and how safety and quality of medicines sold over the Internet can be protected. The broader objective will be to apply a public health framework to evaluate emerging strategies of regulating Internet Pharmacies. In addition to mainstream proposals of expanding the jurisdictional scope of existing regulatory authorities, we consider disruptive internet governance strategies that delegate public health functions to technology intermediaries.

Aria Ilyad Ahmad is the Global Health Foresighting Research Fellow at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research. Since 2014, he has also served as a consultant to the World Health Organization's Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products. Aria is a past Duke University Global Health Fellow and past faculty member of the Global Health Education Initiative at the University of Toronto. He has testified before the Canadian Senate on Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime, served on the board of directors of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, and was the inaugural Médecins Sans Frontières Access to Medicines Fellow in India. Aria received his HBSc and MSc in international pharmaceutical policy from the University of Toronto, and is completing his PhD in global health governance at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Canada.

Register


Dec
2
Mon
2019
Mark Terry Speaks at United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP25)
Dec 2 – Dec 7 all-day
Mark Terry Speaks at United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP25) @ Madrid, Spain

The UN Climate Change Conference COP 25 (2 – 13 December 2019) will take place under the Presidency of the Government of Chile and will be held with logistical support from the Government of Spain. SBSTA 51/ SBI 51 will take place 2-9 December 2019. The pre-sessional period is from 25 November - 1 December 2019. The President-Designate for the conference is Ms. Carolina Schmidt Zaldivar, Minister of Environment of Chile.

The conference is designed to take the next crucial steps in the UN climate change process. Following agreement on the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement at COP 24 in Poland last year, a key objective is to complete several matters with respect to the full operationalization of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

Dahdaleh Institute Postdoc Mark Terry will be speaking on youth engagement through film at the Youth Climate Action Day on December 5, conducting a press conference on December 3, and presenting the winning videos for this year's Global Youth Video Competition.

Feb
5
Wed
2020
Assessing Quality of Tuberculosis Care in South Africa Using Standardized Patients
Feb 5 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
Assessing Quality of Tuberculosis Care in South Africa Using Standardized Patients @ Boardroom, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research

South Africa has the third highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) and the highest burden of TB-HIV co-infection globally. Efforts to curb TB have focussed on strengthening the public sector. Yet, a third of South Africans with active TB symptoms first seek care in the private sector where the quality of care remains poorly understood. In this talk, Angela Salomon will present an ongoing study (2017-2020) utilising the standardised patient (SP) methodology to determine how TB and TB-HIV are managed among private general practitioners (GPs) in an urban area of KwaZulu-Natal province. Eight healthy SPs underwent extensive training in typical TB case presentations and completed 220 unannounced visits with 96 consenting GPs. The results of these clinical interactions as a means to assess quality of care for TB and TB-HIV are presented in this talk.


Speaker

Angie Salomon, MPH, is a medical student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. She works with Assistant Professor Dr. Amrita Daftary (Global Health, York University) and is a research assistant with the McGill International Tuberculosis Centre. There, Angie conducts data management and analysis on a study of the quality of tuberculosis care in South Africa using standardized patients. She also performs a systematic review on interventions to improve linkage gaps along TB-HIV care cascades in low and middle-income countries.

Angie completed her MPH in Epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, where she explored quantitative and mixed-methods research in infectious diseases and maternal health, both at home and abroad. During this time, she worked with the Population Council in Abuja, Nigeria, assessing quality of antenatal care as it pertains to pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. She had previously worked with Grand Challenges Canada as a program assistant for Every Woman Every Child Innovation Marketplace.

Passionate about health equity, Angie works to measure and improve the quality of healthcare delivery locally and globally.


Register


Mar
11
Wed
2020
Health, Hunger, and Malaria in South Asian History
Mar 11 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Health, Hunger, and Malaria in South Asian History @ Room 626, Kaneff Tower, YorkU Keele Campus

A central role for hunger in the historical mortality burden of malaria in colonial South Asia was commonplace in the sanitary records of nineteenth-century British India. Malaria mortality declined markedly with the control of famine after 1920 – a decline that predated by more than three decades the control of malaria transmission in the region with the mid-1950s DDT-based malaria eradication program.

This experience thus highlights the significance of shifts in the lethality of common endemic infections in relation to food security as a central feature of the region’s rising life expectancy from pre-modern levels – an understanding and epistemic framework that generally has been lost in modern epidemiologic, nutritional, and historiographic thought.

The question of how this understanding was lost has epistemological implications beyond South Asia. They include the importance of reclaiming conceptual distinctions between acute and chronic hunger and an epidemiological approach to hunger and subsistence precarity in health history.


Speaker

Sheila Zurbrigg obtained her MD degree from the University of Western Ontario and a Master of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley. Her interest in rural child health led her to India (1974-79), where she helped develop a primary health program in rural Tamil Nadu, working with the traditional village midwives of Ramnad district; this experience led to an analysis of child survival in contemporary India in relation to food security and conditions of women’s work. Her discovery of S.R. Christophers’s 1911 study, Malaria in the Punjab, linking malaria mortality to the price of staple foodgrains, led her to explore more deeply the historical role of hunger in malaria lethality in South Asia, funded as a private scholar by SSHRC. Between 1993 and 2013 she taught part-time at Dalhousie University in the departments of History and International Development Studies. Her most recent historical monograph investigates the epistemic shifts in modern medical and nutritional thought leading to loss of understanding of the role of acute hunger in the region’s malaria mortality history.


Co-presented by the York Centre for Asian Research and the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research.

Mar
13
Fri
2020
Book Launch | The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change
Mar 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Book Launch | The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change @ Arts & Letters Club

Join the Dahdaleh Institute and Postdoc Mark Terry to celebrate the release of his new book, The Geo-Doc: Geomedia, Documentary Film, and Social Change.

Based on his PhD thesis, the book introduces the Geo-Doc as a new form of documentary film designed to maximize the influential power of the documentary film as an agent of social change.


Author

Mark Terry is the Postdoctoral Fellow, Documentary Film & Global Health at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research, cross-appointed at the Faculties of Health and Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. He has worked throughout the global Arctic serving as the Scientist-in-Residence on Adventure Canada’s circumnavigation of Iceland (2018), making the first documented film of a crossing of the Northwest Passage, The Polar Explorer (2011), and teaching at Arctic universities in St. Petersburg and Moscow, Russia. He has also worked in Antarctica with the British Antarctic Survey and the National Antarctic Scientific Center of Ukraine documenting this research in the film The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning (2009).

As a member of The Explorers Club, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the Canadian Council for Geographic Education, the Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Mark teaches and speaks regularly about the environmental issues affecting the fragile eco-systems of the polar regions and, by extension, the world.


Synopsis

This book introduces a new form of documentary film: the Geo-Doc, designed to maximize the influential power of the documentary film as an agent of social change. By combining the proven methods and approaches as evidenced through historical, theoretical, digital, and ecocritical investigations with the unique affordances of Geographic Information System technology, a dynamic new documentary form emerges, one tested in the field with the United Nations. This book begins with an overview of the history of the documentary film with attention given to how it evolved as an instrument of social change. It examines theories surrounding mobilizing the documentary film as a communication tool between filmmakers and policymakers. Ecocinema and its semiotic storytelling techniques are also explored for their unique approaches in audience engagement. The proven methods identified throughout the book are combined with the spatial and temporal affordances provided by GIS technology to create the Geo-Doc, a new tool for the activist documentarian.


Poster

Click here to download the event poster.